The  Durobrivae of  Antoninus - Plate 37

Artis never completed the words to accompany his drawings. The images below include interpretations provided by modern day archaeology specialists.

Plate 37.1

Although the eye is unusually close to the main rod this is probably part of the bolt of a large padlock of a type known from the 4th C hoard of ironwork from Great Chesterford, Essex.  In use, a rod attached to the top of the lock-case will have passed through the eye on this fragment when the body of the bolt (which carried springs of the type seen in Nos. 3, 5-7 below to hold the bolt in position) was pushed into the case of the padlock to close it. Its position suggests that it was one of two eyes the second of which will have been at the end of the rod.  No.6 on this plate is an example of the bolt of a simpler and smaller form of this type of padlock.  Such padlocks are discussed in Manning 1985, 95, fig.25, no.10.

W H Manning - Jan 2019

Plate 37.2

Fragment of a blade which is too fragmentary to identify the type of tool from which it comes, although it is unlikely to have been a knife.

W H Manning - Jan 2019

Plate 37.3

Damaged example of the type of padlock bolt seen in No. 5 on this plate.

W H Manning - Jan 2019

Plate 37.4

An axe blade with its eye filled with corrosion.  The straight front face and the back which curves out as it approaches the edge is characteristic of this type of axe, which is Type 2 in the classification proposed in Manning 1985 (15, fig. 3, No. 2).

W H Manning - Jan 2019

Plate 37.5

Padlock bolt with a solid rectangular head which ends in a flat plate which is slightly wider than head itself.  A central spine, which extends from the head, originally had four springs attached its tip. The rectangular lock-case into which it fitted will have had a rod welded to its top which ended in a rectangular loop set immediately  in front of a bolt-hole the end of the case.  The bolt was pushed through this loop, compressing the springs as it did so, and into the case, where the springs will have sprung back out to prevent the bolt being withdrawn.  The head of the bolt filled the loop and so closed the lock.  It was opened with a key, which was inserted through a slit at the other end of the lock-case and compressed the springs to allow the bolt to be withdrawn. (Manning 1985, 96, Fig. 25, 11).

W H Manning - Jan 2019

Plate 37.6

Padlock bolt with a solid rectangular head which ends in a flat plate which is slightly wider than head itself.  A central spine, which extends from the head, originally had four springs attached its tip. The rectangular lock-case into which it fitted will have had a rod welded to its top which ended in a rectangular loop set immediately  in front of a bolt-hole the end of the case.  The bolt was pushed through this loop, compressing the springs as it did so, and into the case, where the springs will have sprung back out to prevent the bolt being withdrawn.  The head of the bolt filled the loop and so closed the lock.  It was opened with a key, which was inserted through a slit at the other end of the lock-case and compressed the springs to allow the bolt to be withdrawn. (Manning 1985, 96, Fig. 25, 11).

W H Manning - Jan 2019

Plate 37.6

Padlock bolt.  Essentially the same as No 5 above.  The short projection shown above the plate-like top is probably the end of the central spine of the bolt.            

W H Manning - Jan 2019

References

Manning, W. H. 1985:  Catalogue of the Romano-British Tools, Fittings and Weapons in the British Museum (London)

‚Äč

Author Profiles

All Rights Reserved - Nene Valley Archaeological Trust